Wednesday, 30 September 2020

A local authority under fire for censoring a politically-minded piece says it usually stays out of programming decisions - unless the programme conflicts with the views of its councillors.

A local authority that covered up part of a funded artwork it considered offensive says it was necessary to protect its reputation. Artist Christopher Spencer, who works under the name Cold War Steve, said he was upset by Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Councillor Mark Howell's claim that his contribution to the Arts by the Sea Festival "portrays Bournemouth residents and the town in a... read more
Friday, 25 September 2020

Many organisations won't be able to afford the replacement for the furlough system, which only gives employers a small discount on salaries and forbids redundancies.

Photo:

Reid Gilman

A new job support scheme for businesses affected by the coronavirus is cold comfort to the arts and cultural sector, as organisations on a “financial knife edge” fear it won’t be enough to save them. Professional associations reacted strongly to Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s announcement on Thursday,... read more
Friday, 18 September 2020

Campaigners warn that devolved nations' cultural policy is at risk amid rumours Creative Europe will be transferred to the Foreign Office.

Photo:

Julio Albarrán

Cultural policy "should not be seen through the prism of soft power," campaigners say, amid fears proposed legislation will undermine devolved nations' autonomy. The Internal Market Bill, which passed its second reading in parliament this week, would give the UK Government control over funding for... read more
Thursday, 01 October 2020

Arts organisations forced to close due to Covid-19 may now be covered by their insurance. As always, the devil is in the details.

Photo:

Stephen Richards

Arts organisations forced to close due to Covid-19 may be able to claim business interruption insurance following a recent High Court ruling. The UK's Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is warning insurers to pay up after the court ruled in favour of policyholders on most matters in a test case... read more
Thursday, 01 October 2020

A DCMS-commissioned study cites strong evidence that "can be trusted to guide policy" on arts interventions in some areas of health and wellbeing - but not others. 

Photo:

Patrick Baldwin

There is "Grade A" evidence to support the effectiveness of the arts in several areas of healthcare and child development, according to new research. The DCMS-commissioned paper, which looked at more than 3500 studies worldwide, concluded the evidence base is strong "and can be trusted to guide... read more
Wednesday, 30 September 2020

The proportion of adults taking part in the arts is the same as it was in 2005. ACE says there is still progress to be found in the figures.

There has been no growth in engagement with the arts in England for 15 years, official data shows. The Taking Part survey, which has been conducted every year since 2005/06, asks adults how frequently they attend or participate in arts events and canvassses they reasons why they don't attend.  In... read more
Tuesday, 29 September 2020

Emergency funding has finally been approved. Will it reach the sector in time to ensure its survival?

Northern Ireland's arts, cultural and heritage sectors will receive £29m in emergency funding to help them meet the ongoing challenges presented by Covid-19.  The allocation was approved by the country's executive late last week after more than 30 arts organisations told politicians they needed... read more
Thursday, 24 September 2020

DCMS Committee Chair says the postponement of a full reopening of the sector presents an opportunity to do it right.

Photo:

Pippa Fowles

The arts and cultural sector needs "clear guidance" now to ensure it survives the next six months, MPs have told DCMS. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's announcement this week that extended social distancing measures will likely last until March has poured cold water on hopes the sector might reopen... read more
Wednesday, 23 September 2020

Bristol Music Trust says the new title reflects a more inclusive narrative where music - not history - "is at the heart of what we do".

Photo:

Bristol Music Trust

Colston Hall has been renamed Bristol Beacon to "distance itself from any association with its namesake," 17th Century slave trader Edward Colston. The rebranding, announced by Bristol Music Trust Chief Executive Louise Mitchell on Wednesday morning, follows a 4000-person consultation and is part... read more
Tuesday, 22 September 2020

70% of audiences say they are willing to pay for digital events as full capacity shows remain on ice. But the shift towards user-pays models "will be a challenge," experts warn.

Photo:

Thibaut Devulder

Audiences are showing a willingness to pay for 'live digital' events, a survey suggests, offering a small ray of hope as new coronavirus restrictions place the sector into a six month stasis. Frequent arts attendees' online engagement with culture has boomed during the lockdown, more than doubling... read more
Tuesday, 22 September 2020

The latest grim statistics reveal the impact that closed venues and social distancing are having on musicians’ lives and careers.

Photo:

Pexels from Pixabay

Almost half (47%) of musicians have been looking for work outside the music industry and over a third (34%) may never return, according to a survey of Musicians’ Union (MU) members. The figures in the union's Covid-19 Impact Poll show 6% of the 2,000 respondents have no work at all. And those... read more
Friday, 18 September 2020

As schools reopen, the barriers to resuming arts education for disabled children "have been hugely increased".

Arts organisations are struggling to provide for disabled children as schools return amid new coronavirus safety restrictions. The Department for Education (DfE) issued new guidance for England last week that allows visiting music teachers to return and ensemble rehearsals and performances,... read more