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Issue 160: Art on the move , Issue 160: Collaborations

  • Art on the move, Collaborations

    17 Dec 2007

    Charlotte Jones, Chief Executive of ITC, outlines her views on board recruitment, and unveils a plan.

    “Would you like to join our board? The buck stops with you. If we can’t pay our debts you could lose your house. We won’t be paying you any money, but we would expect you to raise funds to forward our work. The hours are unlimited – particularly long if we have a crisis,” – irresistible! Put another way: “Arts organisation seeks board members – fabulous professional development opportunity, excellent networking, raise your profile, add to your CV...”

    So how do arts organisations... more

Also in this feature

  • 17 Dec 2007
  • 17 Dec 2007

    Charlotte Jones, Chief Executive of ITC, outlines her views on board recruitment, and unveils a plan.

  • 17 Dec 2007

    A major project supporting Birmingham?s fledgling creative businesses has co-ordinated development programmes from 18 different partners. Paul Cantrill explains.

  • 17 Dec 2007

    Adriana Marques explains how multi-agency collaborations that involve both artists and the public are contributing to the development of community-focused arts projects.

  • 17 Dec 2007

    Roger Malbert highlights the complex planning behind a touring exhibition and explains how Southbank Centre?s Hayward Touring exhibitions support and complement the activities of independent and gallery-based curators around the UK.

  • 17 Dec 2007

    At first glance you might think that the idea of collaborative working between the arts and Higher Education is not a natural one ? but you would be mistaken. Sally Taylor explains why.

  • 17 Dec 2007

    Attracting 20-somethings through the doors of a museum may seem like an impossible mission. Nikki Bruce explains how a collaborative project in the North East set about achieving it.

  • 17 Dec 2007

    Art on public transport can make the difference between a journey being an endurance test or a pleasure, says Andrew Knight.