News
A survey commissioned by Slough Borough Council and Arts Council England will gather residents’ views about the future of culture and the arts in the town. It will feed into a new cultural...
News
The name of the £50,000 prize, which for 18 years has been called the Man Booker Prize after its major sponsor, the Man Group, will not refer to the new sponsor, billionaire Sir Michael Moritz.
News
Attempts to find out more about the government contract to write a new model music curriculum have been blocked by the Department for Education. Critics of the decision to award it to the ABRSM claim...
News
Voluntary redundancies, early retirement schemes and higher prices for arts and leisure activities are among the measures being considered by Leisure and Culture Dundee after its primary funder, the...
News
Arts Council England warns that without extra funding, rising teacher pension costs could eat up to 10% of a hub’s budget in 2019/20.
News
A DCMS inquiry will assess whether arts and education initiatives were more successful than traditional approaches in connecting with a younger generation.
News
An evaluation of a three-year scheme finds writing programmes should prioritise writing for pleasure, rather than trying to improve technical accuracy.
News
A new three-year Memorandum of Understanding pledges to promote inclusive growth and defend Cornish cultural distinctiveness.
News
Creative Access, set up in 2012, has placed hundreds of candidates from under-represented backgrounds with organisations including the National Theatre, Tate and Leeds Playhouse.
What does it mean to be an ‘emerging artist’ – particularly if you’ve lived with social phobia that has at times left you terrified of ‘emerging’ from your own house? Spoken word poet Susie McComb offers her thoughts and reflections.
For generations people have been concerned about Edinburgh Festival Fringe getting too big. But with questions about financial sustainability louder and more urgent than ever, Phil Miller asks whether it’s finally time for change. 
Creative people may have to change the way they work after a new study found that listening to music – either with or without lyrics – may inhibit the imagination, writes Tom Jacobs.
Feature
Opening up decision-making about what art gets made and by whom doesn't lead to people 'playing it safe', but to programmes that engage more people, more deeply. Tamsin Curror examines the evidence.
Feature
Don't make the mistake of thinking homogenous jargon will push a funder's buttons, says Phoebe Walker.
Feature
The idea of managing intellectual property fills many people with not just uncertainty but dread - which is why the Boosting Resilience programme recently explored a three-stage approach to make it less daunting.
Case study
A welcome surprise of five-year funding provided the opportunity for Cardiff's Sherman Theatre to diversify its audiences, boost volunteering and develop a relationship with a time credit network. Julia Barry tells the story.
Arts People
Hannah Ishmael, an archivist at the Black Cultural Archives, reflects on the colleagues, thinkers and activists who have guided her career. 
News
The success of members of backstage union BECTU at Edinburgh Playhouse in an annual pay rise dispute with ATG could lead to similar rulings for 11 other theatres, potentially affecting up to 210...
News
A 12-month study by the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland revealed music is one of the most popular curriculum subjects but there is ‘unmet demand’ for music education by more than 100,000...
News
The University of the Arts London moved from sixth to second place in the QS University World rankings for art and design, while the Royal College of Art retained the crown as the top university in...
News
The event, which will also involve union Equity and the Old Vic, aims to improve understanding about supporting theatre’s trans community and to forge links between performers and creatives.
A comedic performance at New York’s Carnegie Hall by superstar pianist Yuja Wang, Korean-British pianist Hyung-ki Joo and Russian-German violinist Aleksey Igudesman was riddled with unpleasant and offensive jokes about sexual appeal and Chinese heritage. Was the performance an example of ‘taking control of the narrative’, or just a lewd repetition of tired stereotypes, asks Joshua Barone.
The ‘repatriation issue’ will never go away at museums, and if the institutions are serious about rebuilding trust, they must be transparent about their legacies of imperialism and theft, writes Alice Procter.
News
Phosphoros Theatre Company (PTC) said Heathrow Airport turned away Afghan refugee Syed Haleem Najibi on the advice of Air Malta, which had described the group from PTC as “suspicious” and...
News
A new £4m project by Art UK will catalogue and photograph all 150,000 of the country’s publicly owned sculptures by the end of 2020, making it the first country in the world to have a...

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